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grandman
November 17th, 2004, 11:35 AM
I see questions that are for the hardcore . Recentley Yogis question of hydro steering . Add to that a Atlas transfer , or a Dana 60 . All great stuff . While a Dana 60 is very common the installation will have no stock parts .

But Im a big fan of simple stuff , i like the idea that if i break my rig while out of town there is a good chance i can get a replacement part in the next town or salvage yard .

I try to retain as many simple but effect systems as i can for the project im building .

My rear axle was up graded , i went Ford 8.8 strong enough for my application yet i can find them any where do to there abundance . :)

Long arms on my Grand are not bought there simple a factory arm stretched . If it was to bend bad or snap off i can get a used arm just about any where . They are simple to stretch and can be done in 15 minutes with any avalible welder .

This is just some food for thought , There are many rigs built beyond what can be done simple but it your starting out or have a limited budget , keep in mind simple makes for easy repair .

WhiteRhino
November 17th, 2004, 11:41 AM
There is a lot of merit to Marv's comments. I have a similar example: I am currently running a 140 one wire alternator on my chevy motor. Recently in Canada, it started to fail. Where in Canada could I run out and by a one wire alternator?
Result: I am going to have mine converted back to a standard Chevy 3 wire system. A stock alternator could then be found at any junk yard.

Roadhouse
November 17th, 2004, 01:55 PM
It all depends on what you want to do with your rig, and how hard your gonna push it.

motrctyman
November 19th, 2004, 06:51 PM
Originally posted by grandman@Nov 17 2004, 08:35 AM
Ii like the idea that if i break my rig while out of town, there is a good chance I can get a replacement part in the next town or salvage yard.<div align="right">3243
[/quote]

It totally agree, Marv. A friend just spent a bunch of dough on a custom pair of axles, and now he&#39;s afraid of breaking, and not finding readily available repair parts. He taught me a valuble Off-road lesson.

WhiteRhino
November 19th, 2004, 07:06 PM
Interesting thing I observed at SnoBlind this past year:
A fella broke a front axle shaft on a Currie axle. He called Currie and they told him that each axle from them is unique and even though there was someone else there with a spare Currie axle shaft, it may not fit. And, they couldn&#39;t tell him over the phone if it would. Scary.



Originally posted by motrctyman+Nov 19 2004, 06:51 PM--><div class='quotetop'>QUOTE(motrctyman &#064; Nov 19 2004, 06:51 PM)</div>
<!--QuoteBegin-grandman@Nov 17 2004, 08:35 AM
Ii like the idea that if i break my rig while out of town, there is a good chance I can get a replacement part in the next town or salvage yard.<div align="right">3243


It totally agree, Marv. A friend just spent a bunch of dough on a custom pair of axles, and now he&#39;s afraid of breaking, and not finding readily available repair parts. He taught me a valuble Off-road lesson.
<div align="right">3320</div>
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Buster
November 19th, 2004, 10:59 PM
I agree on the custom length axles. I like stronger stuff, but never like the idea of narrowing for that reason unless you carry spares to fit. Even a simple cv rear shaft failure could be a headache.

I&#39;ve always wondered about the feasability of taking a ford hp dana 44 and cutting the housing so that you could fit standard rubicon 44 front inner shafts with stock ford outers. it would be a lot better front axle than the regular rubi front... if it would work. You&#39;d have high steer option, hp gears, better wheel bearings and lockouts with a 5x5.5 bp.

lgottler
November 21st, 2004, 12:47 AM
Can&#39;t agree more. Part of what made my decisions on my build where based on what is common and easy to get parts for?

I have upgraded axles, but all factory/stock shafts, bearings, brakes, ujoints etc. on them. I have modified the suspension, but retain factory stock YJ leafs, GM stock shackles, Ford stock bushings, Jeep stock control arm bushings in both front modified radius arms and my rear anti-wrap bar.

I modified locations of mounting points to stretch mine roughly 5" and I tried to retain as many stock parts as I could for both cost reasons and for replacement reasons. I tried to simplify my front and rear suspension by a phrase my buddy uses "de-technicalization".

Sure my Jeep sits higher now, but I now can find spare parts everywhere for the axles, rebuild them with a few hand tools, have a simpler suspension design and increased under axle-tube components by about 1" in the front and around 4" in the back.

Sometimes keeping it simple is a lot of work&#33;

Lucas

Saharaboy
November 28th, 2004, 05:51 PM
Keeping it simple is my idea for my rig, the setup I am planning for the winter is going to allow me to atleast use stock parts to get me home where I can deal with it further.