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uncleedsjeep
August 3rd, 2006, 02:29 PM
While on the trail at Rousch Creek in PA I cut the sidewall of my 33X12.50 mudder. After a trip on Memorial Day to PEP Boys I found a 33X12.50 that was a lot less aggressive. At least I had a spare.

Whith that said a new tire was $140 plus. Mastercraft Courser MT. So I set out to see if I could get the sidewall repaired. I found a heavy truck tire store Michigan Tire Distributors, that was willing ot do a sidewall repair. They are going ot do a hot vulcanize patch. There will be some visable buldges on the outside and I will loose one raised letter, but for the $$$, I went for it. I get it back Friday and once I get it installed I will post the results. The quote is $35 but I do not have it back yet. I suspect it is going to have a high speed vibration due to forced variation differences in the tire sidewall, but that is to be seen.
More to come
Ed

WhiteRhino
August 3rd, 2006, 04:03 PM
Talk to Ironman. He had a Swamper repaired with good results.

Of course, I did not find out about this possibility until afer I replaced a Krawler that had a sidewall tear. angry

Tab
August 3rd, 2006, 06:38 PM
When I redo the jeep I dont think I'm going to run a spare. I feel that with dual beadlocks and a good set of plugs/patches/wire, and if all else fails a tube, it isnt really needed. Maybe back at camp but not on the vehicle adding to the weight. I'm sure the tire you get back will be fine but keep us posted.

uncleedsjeep
August 21st, 2006, 10:07 AM
Ed here. I got the tire back. Put it on and it seems fine. I have not air-d down yet but is seems smooth a road speed. There is some distortion on the sidewall but it is the inside anyway. So far so good and for $25, I am good to go.

joe_jeep
August 21st, 2006, 10:59 AM
the spare on my dads jeep was slashed years ago. he had it patched and tubed. worked fine for many years, but it only saw pavement a few times for limited miles. but never leaked air. was still holding air when we sold the jeep.
if your worried tube it!

kb8ymf
August 21st, 2006, 01:03 PM
<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE(Tab &#064; Aug 3 2006, 06&#58;38 PM) 16410</div>

When I redo the jeep I dont think I&#39;m going to run a spare. I feel that with dual beadlocks and a good set of plugs/patches/wire, and if all else fails a tube, it isnt really needed. Maybe back at camp but not on the vehicle adding to the weight. I&#39;m sure the tire you get back will be fine but keep us posted.
[/b]

OK, I give, I&#39;m willing to learn something new.....what&#39;s the hecks the wire for?
j-kb8ymf

WhiteRhino
August 21st, 2006, 01:35 PM
Wire it up like stitches to keep it together. Patch over it.

Deathdealer
August 21st, 2006, 01:42 PM
I thought he was talking about lead wire inserts?

kb8ymf
August 21st, 2006, 02:01 PM
<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE(WhiteRhino &#064; Aug 21 2006, 01&#58;35 PM) 16720</div>

Wire it up like stitches to keep it together. Patch over it.
[/b]

OK, how would you get the wire poked through the sidewall? I think another tool is required here.
And more importantly, has ANYONE ever done this? pictures? Successfull or not?

WhiteRhino
August 21st, 2006, 03:23 PM
I have heard of it being done with old tractor tires useing a leather awl. Can&#39;t say I know for sure........

Creative Fab
August 21st, 2006, 05:00 PM
I have seen a tire wired before in an article in one of the 4x4 rags, an Alaska trip with out a 2nd spare.

They used a fine wire and twisted it together in 3 places and then put a tractor tire patch over it and drove on it several hundred miles to finish their excursion. They used a hot nail to poke a hole in the side wall for stiching.

The tire I have had fixed was done with hot vulcanizing on the inside and out and it has been run at 3 pounds at the dunes several times and is working just fine.

Deathdealer
August 21st, 2006, 05:26 PM
http://www.alltiresupply.com/p-53-437.html

These stems may be used in truck tire repair with a patch when the angle of the injury is too large for a Patch-N-Plug. One advantage of our Max-Seal stem is that you can pull it using ordinary pliers. The Max-Seal insert vulcanizes to become part of the tire.

SPECS:

QUANTITY / BOX 20
DESCRIPTION 3/8" lead wire insert for injuries up to 1/4"

Tab
August 22nd, 2006, 11:39 AM
I would just heat up the wire and push/pull it through, hopefully. It would just be used to close a big gap and try to patch over it or to keep the tube from sticking out. The one I saw done used the wire to close it off tight by twisting the ends together and regular plugs were pushed in and around wherever needed.

uncleedsjeep
September 15th, 2006, 01:18 PM
Interesting discussion i started here. Especially when it got to sewing up the tire. I have now purchased a agricultural tire patch. It is a cold vulacnize patch. I got it from Tractor Supply Company. It is not recommented for auto radial use but i jsut bet it would get me thru the weekend. You can buy radial truck patches that are cold. I will pick one of those up befoe next year.
Ed