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Jarhead
January 3rd, 2013, 12:00 PM
Press Release

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Jan. 3, 2013

Contact: Donna Stine, 517-241-3774 or Ed Golder, 517-335-3014


DNR invites public review and input on draft Michigan Comprehensive Trails Plan

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources (DNR) today announced that a draft of the new Michigan Comprehensive Trails Plan for motorized, non-motorized and water trails is available online for public review and comment.

The draft plan can be viewed on the DNRís Michigan Snowmobile and Trails Advisory Council webpage and also is available on the DNR's State Parks and Trails and Pathways webpages. Comments can be submitted via an online survey that is posted along with the draft. The DNR will accept comments and feedback on the draft plan through Friday, Jan. 25.

The trails plan addresses the status of Michiganís motorized, non-motorized and water trails, and will serve as a guidebook in future decision-making on DNR trail-related programs. Michiganís trails are enjoyed by equestrians, off-road vehicle enthusiasts, snowmobilers, hikers, bikers and cross-country skiers all across the state.

"In offering this draft plan for broad public review, the DNR seeks to get the best possible feedback from the people who most use our extensive trail system and those who would like to enjoy it more," said DNR Parks and Recreation Division Chief Ron Olson. "Michigan is home to a vast and varied trail system. Our goal is to provide a consistent, quality resource that best meets the needs of the steadily increasing number of trail users.Ē

Michiganís extensive trail network Ė and the outdoor recreation, health and economic benefits it brings to nearby communities Ė is contributing to Michigan being recognized nationally not only as the Great Lakes State, but also as the Trail State. Michiganís more than 12,000 miles of trails include over 6,000 miles of snowmobile trails and more than 3,600 miles of off-road vehicle trails. The stateís 2,600-mile rail-trail system is the largest in the nation and continues to grow. Nearly 600 miles of trails are designated equestrian trails, including the 300-mile Shore-to-Shore riding trail. Currently, the Michigan Heritage Water Trails is an initiative connecting communities using navigable waterways with the first designated trail - the River Country Heritage Water Trail - in St. Joseph County.

The PDF is available at http://www.michigan.gov/documents/dnr/draft_mi_trail_plan_12-2012_406477_7.pdf

Than you can complete a short survey at http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/7YM69D2

timbercruiser
January 3rd, 2013, 01:32 PM
It is a farily easy reading document. The language sounds good for trail/route users. Be sure to mention in the survey that we need more challenges on the Route system.

Trail_Fanatic
January 3rd, 2013, 03:54 PM
Please also mention that we don't enjoy the same types of routes as snowmobiles and should NOT be designating snowmobile trails as ORV Routes.

DieselMTU
January 4th, 2013, 12:16 AM
Agreed, there is not strong enough language about making trails fun. I drive a gravel road 4 times a day, I don't need to go up north or out in the woods to do that....

ThumbJeeps
April 10th, 2013, 08:18 AM
Agreed, there is not strong enough language about making trails fun. I drive a gravel road 4 times a day, I don't need to go up north or out in the woods to do that....

x2, Its also really upsetting to see so many areas of ORV trail blocked off because someone abused themselves and their equipment. I think we should incorporate a rating system as Mild, Technical and Difficult and get some of these areas opened back up. I've hit a lot of dead ends around Oscoda & Tawas, dissapointing for sure. I can understand sometimes people get hurt out there, but heck if thats considered just cause you might as well dig 100,000 post holes and block off Saginaw. Its not safe for people anymore.